Curs optional in limba engleza:Immanuel Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason – prof. Bryan Hall

Immanuel Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason

Professor: Bryan Hall, Ph.D., Fulbright Scholar from Indiana University, Southeast

Description: Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason is arguably the most important book from the modern era of philosophy. It had a major influence on subsequent philosophical thinking and remains relevant today. Its main topic is the nature, scope, and limits of human cognition. Its main conclusion is that a priori knowledge, natural science, freedom, and human experience itself are possible if and only if transcendental idealism is true. Transcendental idealism holds that we cannot cognize objects as they might exist in themselves but only insofar as they appear to us spatiotemporally and in accordance with our concepts of them, where not only these concepts but space and time themselves are contributions of the subject to her experience of these objects. The purpose of this course is to give a close, critical reading of the many arguments that that together go to support Kant’s theory of transcendental idealism in the Critique. This course will be taught in English. Classes will be a mixture of lecture, classroom discussion, and close reading of the primary text. The course is open to both undergraduate and graduate students.

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Curs optional in limba engleza: Causation in European Philosophy: The 17th and 18th Centuries

Causation in European Philosophy: The 17th and 18th Centuries

Professor: Bryan Hall, Ph.D., Fulbright Scholar from Indiana University, Southeast

Description: This seminar deals with European Philosophy in the 17th-18th centuries and focuses on the nature of causation which was of particular interest to natural philosophers (the precursors of contemporary scientists) of the period. Although causation is the central theme of the course, it is by no means the only theme. The course will touch on many other important metaphysical and epistemological issues in the Modern period, for example, whether God, the soul, or human freedom exist, what their natures might be, and how we can know these things. All of these different issues will be tied together, however, through our discussion of causation. We will cover a wide variety of interrelated though very different views on causation in the period including those of René Descartes, Nicolas Malebranche, John Locke, Gottfried Leibniz, David Hume, and finally Immanuel Kant. This course will be taught in English. Classes will be a mixture of lecture, classroom discussion, and close reading of the primary texts.

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